Tag Archives: Children’s Books on Values

The Adventures of Bentley Hippo: Inspiring Children to Accept Each Other by Argyro Graphy

About the Book

Bentley is about to board a rocket for the trip of a lifetime.

His friends however are not allowed to join him as they are “different” Inspiring Children to Accept Each Other teaches children about diversity and inclusion.

Children, and adults alike, should:

  • celebrate individuality
  • embrace our differences
  • accept one’s abilities and not focus on their disabilities
  • recognize and respect diversity and
  • promote inclusivity

Too short, too tall, curly hair, no hair, dark skin light skin, walking or wheeling, children will see themselves through the diverse characters known to Bentley as ‘his friends’.

A great conversation starter for parents, teachers, and educators, Inspiring Children to Accept Each Other reinforces the importance of being different, and that we all matter and we all belong.

Children’s favorite kindness advocate, Bentley, is faced with a decision to follow his dream or stand by his friends.

A great gift for any child that may wonder why they are different, why they are excluded, or perhaps question their self-worth.

Recommend by psychologists as a wonderful resource to share with children with special needs reinforcing their belief that they are just as important as anyone else and that we all must celebrate our abilities and not focus on our disabilities.

Argyro Graphy’s final installment in the Inspiring Children’s Series, featuring Bentley Hippo, expresses the need for everyone to accept each other regardless of their differences or disabilities.

Bentley’s friends planned a wonderful surprise for him as a way to say thank you for all his help. The friends were all very excited and hoping to share in Bentley’s surprise, but a uniformed man was rude to everyone.

Each main character has a difficulty to face. Bentley the Hippo is vision impaired; Toby the Elephant has diabetes and kidney issues; Jaxon the Monkey has ADHD; Marty the Lion has alopecia and Daisy the giraffe has autism and impaired hearing. Along the way, in earlier books, these friends have encountered other children with disabilities such as cancer.

The author has done a skillful job of conveying how words and tones can harm and hurt one’s feelings. I like how Bentley sticks up for his friends. However, I felt his tone was a little too assertive, especially if he is a child. Granted, the adult he was talking to was very rude, and Bentley was much kinder.

In the end, Bentley taught someone an important message on kindness and acceptance.

The final book of this series is, like all the others, a helpful tool for teaching children valuable lessons. The illustrations are rich and vibrant, created in a pleasing, eye-catching way that is sure to keep children engrossed and drawn into the story.

I received The Adventures of Bentley Hippo: Inspiring Children to Accept Each Other from BookSirens. However, I was under no obligation to post a positive review. All opinions are my own.

Bird Hugs by Ged Adamson

My first thought upon beginning to read Bird Hugs was how wonderful to read a book that focused on how a perceived disability could become a welcome ability. I didn’t change my mind upon finishing the book.

Many members of my family work, or have worked/volunteered, for a residential facility for physically and mentally handicapped adults. Reading this book gave me a warm feeling at how sweetly this story was written and illustrated.

The illustrations are so cute, from Bernard the bird, to the sad orangutan and all their friends. Children will learn about a lot of different kinds of animals by reading Bird Hugs.

I was disappointed with the formatting, however. Perhaps it’s only a problem for the Kindle edition, but you must constantly turn the book from portrait to landscape and back again.

I received this e-book as an Amazon First Reads selection. However, I was not required to write a review.

Publisher’s Summary

Bernard isn’t like other birds. His wings are impossibly long, and try as he might, he just can’t seem to fly. He’s left wondering what his wings are good for…if they’re even good for anything at all. But a chance encounter with a dejected orangutan leads Bernard to a surprising discovery: that maybe what makes him different is actually something to be embraced.

About Author

Ged Adamson is a children’s author and illustrator. He lives in London with his partner Helen and son Rex.