Category Archives: Friday Flashback

Friday Flashback to Saturday Silly

(An Oldie!)

For a couple years I’ve blamed being tired on lack of sleep or too much pressure from being a homemaker, but now I’ve found out the real reason that I am always tired. I’m overworked. 

The population of this country is 237 million. 104 million are retired. That leaves 133 million to do the work.

There are 85 million in school, which leaves 48 million to do the work.        

Of this there are 29 million employed by the federal government, leaving 19 million to do the work.       

2.8 million are in the Armed Forces, which leaves 16.2 million to do the work. 

14,800,000 people work for State and City Governments. That leaves 1.4 million to do the work. 
       
At any given time there are 188,000 people in hospitals, leaving 1,212,000 to do the work.       

Given that there are 1,211,998 people in prisons, that leaves just two people to do the work, you and me. 
      
And you’re sitting at your computer reading jokes!

Have a great weekend!!

Flashback to Saturday Silly

A little girl was holding her stomach saying, “Mommy, my tummy hurts.” Her mother replied, “That’s because it’s empty, you have to put something in it!”

Later, the Pastor and his wife were visiting and stayed for dinner. The Pastor wasn’t feeling well and said, “I have a terrible headache!”

The little girl perked up and smiled her sweetest smile. Then said, “Mom says that’s because it’s empty and you need to put something in it!”

Flashback to Saturday Silly

A man walks into a restaurant, sits down, and orders a big dish of brown rice and stir-fry veggies.

He grabs a handful of peanuts from the bowl on in front of him and as he starts to chew he hears a voice say, “That’s a beautiful tie. Is that silk?  NICE choice!”

Wondering who would make such an unusual comment, he looks around and doesn’t see anyone near him. With a shrug, he pops a few more peanuts into his mouth.

Then he hears, “Those shoes are styling. Are they Italian leather? They look GRRREAT!”

He turns around again but sees no one near him. Glancing nervously at his shoes, he self-consciously tucks them under the stool.

Feeling weird, he grabs another handful of peanuts. This time he hears, “That suit looks FANTASTIC! Is it an Armani? Very nice!”

He calls the waiter over and tells him, “Look. I keep hearing these voices telling me how great my tie, my shoes, and my suit look.  Am I going CRAZY?”

“Oh,” the waiter replies nonchalantly, “those are just the peanuts.”

“The PEANUTS?” the man asks, staring at the bowl beside him.

“Sure,” replies the waiter, “they’re complimentary!”

Friday Flashback: I Don’t Want to Eat Bugs (Lisbon’s Misadventures Book 1) by Rachel Branton (Author), Tim Petersen (Illustrator)

I Don’t Want to Eat Bugs is a cute book about a little girl, named Lisbon, who is so hungry she doesn’t want to wait for dinner.

Lisbon goes on a fun adventure looking for food when she encounters several animals that offer to share their yummy food, except yuck, it is not yummy! The animals offer a wide variety of different foods they like, from bugs to dog food, but, of course, Lisbon isn’t interested!

The story is an effective way for children to learn about animals’ food and an appreciation for their own food. The illustrations are bright and colorful, and they are creative enough to capture a child’s imagination. The characters are charming and fit the story perfectly, too. I love her little stuffed frog!

One very subtle lesson is the importance of sharing, even if it is bugs!!

I Don’t Want to Eat Bugs is a great book to read to young children who are not yet able to read and also for those who have learned or are learning to read.

This entertaining book is currently free on Amazon. (Not an affiliate.) As always, be sure to check the price before purchasing, in case there are changes in pricing.

Publisher’s Summary

Bugs are for the birds!

Lisbon is hungry and it’s hard to wait for dinner. When her animal friends try to help her find something tasty to eat, the real the problems begin! Join Lisbon on her funny misadventures.

Each beautiful illustration is designed to inspire the imaginations of children. An activity page at the end of the book allows for more fun as they search for special
items in the illustrations.

This version of I Don’t Want to Eat Bugs has been designed specifically for eBook with a fixed layout and larger text for easy reading. While this is a great read-aloud book for parents, teachers, and other adults to share with children, we have chosen fonts that are similar to the way children form letters for easy recognition as they begin to read on their own. The print book is also available in 8.5” x 11” format.

Author’s Note:

I Don’t Want to Eat Bugs was written for my daughter, who was two when I wrote this story and didn’t like salad, but now she’s four and a half and loves it—if I give her plenty of salad dressing! (But don’t worry—this isn’t a book about eating salad.) Of course birds, cats, and dogs have a very different idea of what’s good to eat, but through this fun adventure, Lisbon learns there is also food meant just for her—and it’s good, especially compared with all the offerings from her animal friends.

My daughter and I privately call this book the “Ice Cream Story” (she LOVES ice cream so there had to be ice cream involved), and now whenever something funny happens, she says, “We should write a new ice cream story about that.”

And we have! I Don’t Want to Eat Bugs is the first book in a series called Lisbon’s Misadventures. Book 2, I Don’t Want to Have Hot Toes, is now available!

Recommended ages: 2-7.

Friday Flashback: Bedtime, Little Bear by John Lancer

This adorable book is currently free on Amazon!

Publisher’s Summary

Little Bear doesn’t want to go to bed. He wants to keep playing. When Mother Bear and the forest animals call to him, he pretends he can’t hear. But the sun is sinking and soon it will be dark. Will Little Bear find his way home before nighttime comes? Find out in this magical, moonlit, bedtime story.

Bedtime, Little Bear is an endearing story about loveable Little Bear, who, like all children, does not want to go to bed!

Little Bear is having so much fun playing!  Several times he thinks he hears his mother calling him. But he convinces himself that he doesn’t really hear her, even though his little friends tell him they also heard her.

The story’s pictures of Little Bear and all the woodland creatures, plus the changing of time from twilight and dusk to nightfall, are charming, delightful and enchanting. I so enjoyed the fanciful, creative and whimsical illustrations; they make you want to join Little Bear in his playtime, and then give him a huge goodnight hug, too!

Bedtime, Little Bear perhaps could have been better if Little Bear received some type of consequence for his misbehavior. However, I feel it might detract from the story. There is no age recommendation that I could find, but I am guessing it is perfect for the 1 to 5 age frames. At this age, children are more involved in the story’s plot than concerned with the lack of discipline. Some precocious children may question why nothing happened; in which case, this story turns into a good learning experience.

Review of Renewed and Part 2 of Interview with Author Heather M. Dixon

Publisher’s Summary

Few things make us feel as helpless as living with a story we don’t like. Maybe one that involves the loss of a loved one, an unwanted transition, a difficult diagnosis, or a dream that fell through. At one time or another, we all deal with disappointments and feelings that life is unfair or that we are being punished.

In Renewed, a four-week study of the Book of Ruth, women glean wisdom from Naomi’s perspective, a woman who lived a story she didn’t choose or like. Forced to chart a new path as she mourned the loss of her husband and two sons, Naomi learned that the journey from bitterness to renewed hope and joy was rooted in God’s promise of redemption.

With insight from her own journey of living with a story that is not easy, Heather teaches women to flourish even as they live hard stories through a willingness to trust that God can transform them and trade their heartache for hope. They will learn to rely on God’s movement in the details of their story, even when it can’t be seen, gain confidence to act in the part of their stories that they can change, and watch expectantly for God to redeem the parts they can’t.

Components for this four-week Bible study, available separately, include a Participant Workbook with Leader Helps and a DVD with four 20 to 25-minute segments (with closed captioning).

  • A four-week study of the Book of Ruth from Naomi’s perspective.
  • This shorter study is ideal for in-between or busy times. 
  • Helps women find the courage to live with a story they don’t like and trust in God.
  • Participant Workbook with Leader Helps includes group sessions guides, discussion questions, prayers, video viewer guides, and more.
  • DVD features dynamic, engaging teaching in four 20 to 25-minute segments.

Heather Dixon has taken a Bible story that most of us know, and flipped it on its head. Instead of focusing on Ruth, the title of the Biblical story and its protagonist, she focuses on Naomi, Ruth’s mother-in-law.

Renewed: Finding Hope When You Don’t Like Your Story is a brilliantly written Bible Study. Dixon delves into the story of Naomi with great wisdom, feeling and insight. She gets real and personal about her own journey, a story she didn’t and doesn’t like. However, with God’s grace and constant communication with the Him, she has been able to succeed, thrive and grow in her life and Christian walk.

I relate to Dixon’s life for numerous reasons and I am grateful for her Bible study. She has written it in an easy to follow format, with a schedule of three days a week for intense study and a break of four days, which makes it perfect for in-depth study.

I feel everyone can benefit from this study. There are several methods of learning to include a Participant Workbook with Leader Helps and a DVD that has four 20-25-minute segments with closed captioning.

I received Renewed: Finding Hope When You Don’t Like Your Story from I Read with Audra Blog Tours. However, I was under no obligation to post a review.

Part 2 of Interview with Heather M. Dixon, Author of Renewed

(See Part 1 here)

While most studies on the book of Ruth focus on the book’s namesake, in Renewed: Finding Hope When You Don’t Like Your Story (Abingdon Press), Heather M. Dixon focuses in on Ruth’s widowed mother-in-law instead. “I’ve always read and taught Ruth from Naomi’s perspective because ultimately, I think it’s her story,” Dixon explains. “For all believers, a transformed heart is one of the key identifiers of life with Christ and as readers, we get to experience that journey with Naomi—from bitterness to renewed joy. Her transformation echoes that of anyone who has struggled with a hard story and found Jesus to be faithful along the way. It’s also my personal belief that Naomi’s response to grief has often been judged too harshly. I wanted to give my readers a safe place to explore feelings of bitterness as they learned to look for God’s movement in their own story.”

In Renewed, women glean wisdom from Naomi’s perspective, a woman who lived a story she didn’t choose or like. Forced to chart a new path as she mourned the loss of her husband and two sons, Naomi learned that the journey from bitterness to renewed hope and joy was rooted in God’s promise of redemption.

Q: Is it OK to grieve the parts of our stories that we don’t like or is that self-pity? What can we learn from Naomi’s bitterness about her situation?

You have permission to grieve! Naomi was bitter because of her circumstances (and who wouldn’t be?), but she still remembered God’s sovereignty. Did He punish her for her bitterness? No, He was always working for her good as He brought renewed hope to her life. Her story reminds us that it’s okay to grieve. It’s okay to say this is not what we wanted. It’s okay to acknowledge this isn’t how things should be. We don’t have to be afraid of expressing our honest feelings to God because he understands. Jesus wept for His friend Lazarus, even when He knew He was about to raise him to life.

I think our society has much to learn from an example that values a natural and healthy grief process over stoicism. What’s more, the expression of grief is an acknowledgement that this broken world needs Jesus. When we let it, grief can be a vehicle for deep intimacy with Jesus.

Q: We’re familiar with how Boaz was the kinsmen-redeemer who rescued Ruth, but how did he redeem Naomi? How does this parallel the gospel story and our need for a redeemer?

The gospel story is rooted in redemption and renewal. From the pages of Genesis 3, the promise for redemption through Jesus has always been God’s plan for this world. (“And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and hers; he will crush your head, and you will strike his heel.” – Genesis 3:15) The kinsman-redeemer promise extended to Naomi also. When Boaz married Ruth, he redeemed all of Naomi’s property that she acquired through the death of her husband and sons. For Naomi, Boaz’s purchase of her property promised provision and care for her future. Without Boaz, she would be debt-ridden and destitute, but his redemption of her property made way for the renewal of her story.

Similarly, through His death on the cross, Jesus purchased our salvation with His blood. He redeemed all that may have been lost from our past circumstances and the entire debt we owe to God for our sins. His purchase promises our provision and care for eternity. Without Him, we would be unable to pay the debt we owe to God. But because of Jesus’ sacrifice for us, we have everlasting hope for renewed joy.

Q: How was Naomi reminded that God would always provide?

I adore that one of the motifs from the book of Ruth is the empty-to-full motif. Naomi was empty in every way at the beginning of her story, but it ends with her being full—full with food, family, happiness, offspring. God provided for her every need. God provided companionship for Naomi through Ruth’s determination to stay with her. God provided food for Naomi and Ruth in what would have appeared to be a stranger’s field, but it wasn’t. God provided family through Ruth’s marriage to Boaz. He provided happiness through the birth of her grandson, Obed. And He provided offspring and blessing and security through Obed’s family line, which was the human ancestral family line for Jesus.

Q: What does Naomi’s story teach us about hope for our own situations?

I remember watching my elementary school friends on the playground, climbing up the tall ladder to mount the slide and zooming down it without fear. Hands up and laughing all the way down, they were free and joyful. I didn’t think I could do it myself, but watching them gave me hope. If they could do it, maybe I could too. I sense the same feelings rising when I read Naomi’s story.

She was a woman who walked through what many of us fear the most: the death of precious loved ones and life-altering change. And yet, if God could renew her story, why couldn’t He do it for mine as well? Naomi’s story teaches us that God is sovereign, loving, strategic, and compassionate. Her story prompts us to courageously lift our chins and say “He did it for Naomi, He can do it for me too.” There is hope in that. As a second-grader, I raised my hands as I slid down the slide. As a woman who has experienced much grief and change, I now place my story in God’s capable hands, knowing that God is always working for my good, even when I can’t see it. And that renewed joy is always just around the corner when I am walking with Jesus.

Q: Did you write Renewed for a specific audience of women?

Yes, absolutely. I wrote Renewed for any woman that is carrying a difficult and life-altering story. I wrote it for the woman who is not just walking through a season of hardship, but who has experienced a story that they did not choose and cannot change.

I also wrote it for the woman who yearns to trust God’s sovereignty and His plan for her life even as she grieves and is angered by her circumstances. Trusting God and grieving your story are not mutually exclusive. Renewed is for the woman who needs an honest space to do both as God fills them with hope.

Q: Tell us about the format of the study. How long does each lesson take and how many weeks are in the study?

Because we lead busy lives, this study is designed with just four weeks of study, and three days of lessons each week. Each day’s lesson will guide you through personal study of a passage from Ruth as well as application of what you’ve learned. This study is intentionally designed to offer a flexible but thorough plan to walk through the entire book of Ruth. You may find that setting time aside on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays to go through each lesson works best for your schedule. Or perhaps it may be better to work through them on the weekends. Depending on your learning and study style, I would expect to spend 20-30 minutes on each lesson.

Q: What other Renewed resources are available to go along with the study?

The study itself includes a participant workbook with leader helps, but a DVD with four 20 to 25-minute segments (with closed captioning) is available for separate purchase also. The teaching videos are also available via AmplifyMedia.com, and streaming from Cokesbury.com.
https://facebook.us18.list-manage.com/track/click?u=312d9c42859d078a024ef39aa&id=61db97d14c&e=7e3523fd46

Heather M. Dixon is an author, speaker, and Bible teacher who understands living with a story that is not easy. Diagnosed with an incurable and terminal genetic disorder that she inherited from her mother, she is passionate about encouraging and equipping women to trust in God, face their greatest fears, and live with hope, especially in the midst of difficult circumstances.

When she is not blogging at The Rescued Letters (https://facebook.us18.list-manage.com/track/click?u=312d9c42859d078a024ef39aa&id=24dde05ee1&e=7e3523fd46) or speaking at women’s conferences and events, Dixon loves to make the most of everyday moments such as cooking for her husband and son, brainstorming all the possible ways to organize Legos and superheroes, checking out way too many library books, or unashamedly indulging in her love for all things Disney.

Dixon is a regular contributor to Journey magazine and the author of women’s Bible studies, Determined: Living Like Jesus in Every Moment and Renewed: Finding Hope When You Don’t Like Your Story.

Visit Heather M. Dixon online attherescuedletters.com (https://facebook.us18.list-manage.com/track/click?u=312d9c42859d078a024ef39aa&id=b10a43f432&e=7e3523fd46) . She can also be found on Facebook (Heather M. Dixon – The Rescued Letters) (https://facebook.us18.list-manage.com/track/click?u=312d9c42859d078a024ef39aa&id=10fcc2e511&e=7e3523fd46) , Twitter (@rescuedletters) (https://facebook.us18.list-manage.com/track/click?u=312d9c42859d078a024ef39aa&id=d2fc72ea36&e=7e3523fd46) , and Instagram (@rescuedletters) (https://facebook.us18.list-manage.com/track/click?u=312d9c42859d078a024ef39aa&id=21dadeb81b&e=7e3523fd46

Friday Flashback: Charisse by Fay Lamb

My Review

I started reading Fay Lamb’s books in The Tie that Binds series, and was unable to put them down!! I read Charisse, and immediately went to Libby, then Hope.

Charisse is recently widowed and trying to stay above water not only for her sake but also for her young son, Vance, Jr. (V. J.) Her only hope is to go to work as the clerk for Judge Gideon Tabor, the man that releases the monster who killed her husband.

I ran the gamut of emotions reading Charisse’s story. I could understand her anger and feelings of wanting to avenge her husband’s death by remaining cold and distant toward Gideon, even though she had a crush on him in high school. I could also understand how his kindness could throw her off and make her vulnerable. I fell in love with her son, V. J., and wished I could take on his pain. I alternated between righteous indignation and cheering for Gideon. I also wanted to shake some sense into another judge, Delilah James, more than a few times!

Fay Lamb has a real, rare gift for placing you right smack in the middle of the action and making you feel as if you, too, are one of the key players.

Her portrayal of the Christian faith displayed by the characters in the book is authentic and uplifting. It is written in a natural, relatable way, woven expertly and seamlessly throughout, giving us a feeling of optimism and promise.

I honestly would love to have Charisse and V. J. as neighbors and friends. I’m also very excited that there are two more stories!! I am dreading the end of the series, as I love the characters.

Fay Lamb’s story Charisse is well-written, relatable and endearing.

I received Charisse from the author. However, I was under no obligation to write a review.

Publisher’s Review

******The author is donating 100% of her royalties from this book to hurricane relief through Samaritan’s Purse.********This author donates 100% of her royalties to Christian charities.********

Charisse Wellman’s husband has been gone a year, and she’s about to lose the only home her son, V.J., has ever known. She’s quit law school, but the money just isn’t there. Her only option is to work as a law clerk for her ex-friend, Gideon Tabor. The only problem: Gideon is the judge who let her husband’s killer go free, and Gideon doesn’t know the connection.

Gideon Tabor can’t believe that the woman interviewing for the job is the girl he loved in high school. Charisse is hesitant about accepting his job offer, and when she does, Gideon makes every attempt to apologize for his relationship-ending blunder in high school. Charisse accepts his apology, but she keeps him at a distance. When Gideon learns that Charisse’s anger actually stems from his release of the man who ran down her husband, he tries to explain, but Charisse doesn’t want Gideon’s excuses or the love he has to offer. She wants her husband’s killer to pay.

(Previously published in 2017)

Friday Flashback (Two Posts In One) Penguin and Moose by Hannah C. Hall

This is one of the CUTEST stories, with a Fantastic message for children. If you have a child, know a child, or work with children-check it out.

Penguin and Moose, by Hannah C. Hall, is an adorable book and is charmingly and delightfully illustrated by Anna Chernyshova. 

Penguin discovers he has a problem most birds don’t have. His best friend, Moose, is more than willing to help him remedy the situation. After all, what are friends for? Thus, begins one of the cutest children’s books I have read. Penguin and Moose is geared toward the preschool to 3rd-grade level (approximately 4 to 8 years of age). However, it will definitely delight readers of all ages.

Friends are precious and wonderful. The story of Penguin and Moose not only clarifies but also spotlights their importance in a delightful and enchanting way.

Hannah Hall helps children learn more by using a Bible verse to further the point, but she does it in a non-preachy way.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher, Worthy Kids. However, I was under no obligation to post a review.

Friday Flashback: 12 Days at Bleakly Manor: Book One in Once Upon a Dickens Christmas by Michelle Griep

My Review

If you enjoy stories with mystery and intrigue, twists and turns keeping you guessing at who is orchestrating the events, quick short reads (only 192 pages) and best of all-tied up with a Christmas bow-then Bleakly Manor is the perfect short story for you!

I don’t usually like mystery/suspense stories. However, Michelle Griep’s first book in her series, Once Upon a Dickens Christmas, exudes just the right amount of inscrutability, that you will be reading quickly to get to the “who is doing it?” and then you’ll wish you’d savored it just a little longer.

Although there are some intense, mildly violent scenes, the story overall is one of trying to recover what each person feels they have lost. Some of the characters, like most people, are more at peace with themselves and God than others. Hence some are more pugnacious and crueler than others.

Don’t expect a happy time at Christmas in Bleakly Manor; it isn’t there in an overt or obvious way. Nonetheless, the ending (and the explanation of the traditions) provides the skinny Christmas bow.

I’m looking forward to the next edition in the series, and there is a sneak peek at the end of the book!

I received this book from Barbour Publishing. However, I was under no obligation to post a review.

Publisher’s Review

A mysterious invitation to spend Christmas at an English manor home may bring danger…and love?

England, 1851: When Clara Chapman receives an intriguing invitation to spend Christmas at an English manor home, she is hesitant yet feels compelled to attend—for if she remains the duration of the twelve-day celebration, she is promised a sum of five hundred pounds.

But is she walking into danger? It appears so, especially when she comes face to face with one of the other guests—her former fiancé, Benjamin Lane.

Imprisoned unjustly, Ben wants revenge on whoever stole his honor. When he’s given the chance to gain his freedom, he jumps at it—and is faced with the anger of the woman he stood up at the altar. Brought together under mysterious circumstances, Clara and Ben discover that what they’ve been striving for isn’t what ultimately matters.

What matters most is what Christmas is all about . . . love.

Pour a cup of tea and settle in for Book 1 of the Once Upon a Dickens Christmas series–a page-turning Victorian-era holiday tale–by Michelle Griep, a reader and critic favorite.

Friday Flashback/Guest Blogger – WholefoodFor a Whole Life

Some of you already know a little about me from previous posts sharing stories from our lives or from talking with me in comments. For those of you that aren’t familiar, I’m Robbie’s youngest daughter, Melissa. Mom asked me to “guest blog” today about my health and diet after many of you have shown interest in learning more. While this is the condensed version and I’m going to keep it mostly to my journey, as well as how to get started on a whole food plant-based diet, I suggest getting a beverage of your choice. It’s time to settle in and get comfortable. If there’s a lot of interest I will be happy to do more guest blogs as requested. If you enjoy what I’ve shared with you, be sure to reply, like, and reblog to let mom know you want more!

I’ve always been a very active and health-conscious person, yet I struggled like most people, with the misinformation that regularly bombards us. I worked out and ran daily, regularly did calisthenics, ballet, hiking, and ate what I thought was healthy. I would splurge, drinking soda or eating sweets, but never thought it was doing much harm with occasional treats. All of my life I’ve suffered from autoimmune troubles that would cause pain or injuries. I chose to reconcile myself with this and live my life to the fullest anyway, not letting it stop me or slow me down. In my 20s I contracted Lyme disease; regretfully the doctors didn’t realize what it was and took months to treat it appropriately. The long-term damage to my joints and nerves was irreversible. Given I already suffered from autoimmune concerns, this added more complications and frustration to a growing list of health troubles. A few years later I suffered multiple herniated discs with sciatica that caused nerve damage in my foot, with some loss of feeling and weakness. Despite all my efforts with exercise, physical therapy, and staying active, by my mid-twenties arthritis and inflammation were already a problem in several major joints. At this point, not being physically capable of doing my normal activities and exercises, anxiety and depression started sinking in and becoming unbearable. The realization hit me that exercise and an active lifestyle weren’t enough, I needed to help my body to recover and be strong enough to fight off the decline that was rapidly descending upon me. The thought nagging constantly at me was, “If I’m putting into my body things that cause inflammation every day I’m making it harder for my body to actually recover!” Something had to change.

The first step, I thought, was to remove soda and overly processed sugars entirely from my diet. This was much more difficult than I imagined it would be. Should be simple, just drink or eat something else! The problem is your body becomes accustomed and, essentially, addicted to these sugary bombs of endorphins. I had to gradually wean myself off the sodas and work hard, over several months, to lower my intake of processed sugars. While I started to regain some energy and mental clarity I was still regularly in pain and would often have a multitude of flair-ups. I spoke with my physical therapist and doctor, they would joke, “If you were overweight we’d talk about diet, but you aren’t so let’s focus on your exercises.” The exercises helped, but I was only getting by. I wanted to thrive.

By what I believe to be a gentle nudge from above, I stumbled on to a review of the book, How Not to Die by Dr. Greger. At first, I was skeptical. I study science, mostly behavioral, and with this education and experience, I’ve learned to question everything. Dr. Greger was thorough enough to include information to look up every single study he talks about in his book. This sent me down a deep, twisting rabbit hole of science and information that was not readily available to me prior. I buried myself in research and regularly visited his website while cross-referencing everything back to the studies themselves to read through all of them for any inconsistencies. I desperately wanted to prove it wrong. My doctors never spoke about diet as an option, they totally discounted it. How can any of this be true? Milk causes inflammation? Eggs are not healthy? Meat is a carcinogen?!? Processed meats are listed as Group 1 carcinogen (the same as Tobacco and Asbestos, according to WHO)? Yet time and again the studies and research showed this could be true, everything Dr. Greger said (and everyone else I looked into) was true. To solidify my resolve I watched “Forks over Knives”. While much of it is a bit over the top I felt like I had finally woken up, I had taken the red pill and was no longer in the Matrix. I couldn’t unknow what I had learned.

After a lot of soul-searching, I made the switch. Gradually I cut all animal products out of my life. There were ups and downs, many times I fell back to old habits, but I stuck with it as best I could. I started by removing meat, then eggs, eventually milk and cheese. The cheese was the hardest one to let go. A few months later I eliminated most processed foods in general and sustained a predominately whole food, plant-based diet. After some time of fully plant-based, it became easier to adjust recipes and make meals. Everything was becoming second nature and it wasn’t a daily struggle of, “What on Earth do I make for dinner?!” As time went by something amazing happened, my anxiety was mostly under control and the pain I lived with most of my life was subsiding. I called my mother and said tentatively “I don’t want to jinx it mom, but that constant nagging pain of level seven or eight I’ve always had? I actually forgot about it for several days. I haven’t had pain, sure normal aches, but not MY aches.” As I continued on this path my energy levels increased, mental clarity and sharpness heightened, the pain was minimal, and overall I was thriving. I was once again able to do my workouts and be more active which allowed my body to heal more and continue on a better path to recovery.

Do I believe everyone would have these results? Honestly, I don’t know. Do I believe everyone could benefit from a whole-food, plant-based diet? Absolutely! Will it cure all your troubles? I’m not a doctor so I can’t say if that’s possible but I can encourage you to look into it yourself. Listed below are some websites and links to pages that helped me along my journey. I’m listing only Dr. Greger’s pages because he has the science and studies to back the information. If anyone is interested in other suggestions I will happily share those as well. You’re welcome to ask questions here and if there’s interest I’ll return for a Q&A or more guest blogs. The most important information I can give you is to do the best you can for you and to allow yourself to thrive. Don’t fall into a trap of “getting by.” Stay positive and keep striving to be the best version of yourself.

Dr. Greger’s site
https://nutritionfacts.org

Dr. Greger’s Daily Dozen, which greatly simplified my transition
https://nutritionfacts.org/video/dr-gregers-daily-dozen-checklist/

#Forksoverknives  #Drgreger   #hownottodie   #plantbased

Reprint of previous blog.